Media Coverage

Bio-inspired cybersecurity system detects 'bad apples'

03/22/2017

Sophisticated cybersecurity systems excel at finding 'bad apples' in computer networks, but they lack the computing power to identify the threats directly.

How a new brain-inspired cybersecurity system can detect attacks 100 times faster

03/22/2017

... Follett is a pediatric neurologist and neuroscientist who studies developmental diseases, such as cerebral palsy in children. Her husband, David Follett, co-founder and CEO of Lewis Rhodes Labs, used her work as the basis for a computational model of how the brain processes information.

Brain inspiration leads to faster, more efficient cybersecurity system

03/22/2017

... The Neuromorphic Cyber Microscope, designed by Lewis Rhodes Labs in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories, directly addresses this limitation.

Brain inspiration leads to faster, more efficient cybersecurity system

03/22/2017

... Sophisticated cybersecurity systems excel at finding "bad apples" in computer networks, but they lack the computing power to identify the threats directly.

Cybersecurity System Detects Threats 100 Times

03/22/2017

Lewis Rhodes Labs in partnership with Sandia has developed a sophisticated cybersecurity system to detect general indicators of an attack nearly 100 times faster.

New brain-inspired cybersecurity system detects "bad apples" 100 times faster

03/22/2017

Cybersecurity is critical — for national security, corporations and private individuals. Sophisticated cybersecurity systems excel at finding "bad apples" in computer networks, but they lack the computing power to identify the threats directly.

Brain-Inspired System Aims to Improve Threat Detection

03/22/2017

A new "brain-inspired" computer system promises improved detection of cyber threats by looking for specific patterns that can more efficiently reveal indicators of compromise in a network.

KASA Albuquerque Channel 2

03/21/2017

... Lewis Rhodes Labs -- a company collaborating with sandia on brain research -- developed a processor that mimics some of the brain's reasoning power. it turns out -- that helps a computer recognize suspicious activity faster.

New Brain-Inspired Cybersecurity System Detects 'Bad Apples' 100 Times Faster

03/21/2017

... The Neuromorphic Cyber Microscope, designed by Lewis Rhodes Labs in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories, directly addresses this limitation. Due to its brain-inspired design, it can look for the complex patterns that indicate specific "bad apples," all while using less electricity than a standard 60-watt light bulb.

'Bad Apples' Noticed 100 Times Faster by New Brain-Inspired Cybersecurity System

03/21/2017

The Neuromorphic Cyber Microscope, designed by Lewis Rhodes Labs in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories owing to its brain-inspired design, it can look for the complex patterns that indicate specific "bad apples," all while using less electricity than a standard 60-watt light bulb.

New brain-inspired cybersecurity system detects 'bad apples' 100 times faster

03/21/2017

Cybersecurity is critical — for national security, corporations and private individuals.

New brain-inspired cybersecurity system detects 'bad apples' 100 times faster

03/21/2017

... Sophisticated cybersecurity systems excel at finding "bad apples" in computer networks, but they lack the computing power to identify the threats directly.

New brain-inspired cybersecurity system detects 'bad apples' 100 times faster

03/21/2017

... These limits make it easy for new species of "bad apples" to evade modern cybersecurity systems. And security analysts must sort the real dangers from false alarms, such as the nonsense phrase "forbad applesauce."

New brain-inspired cybersecurity system detects 'bad apples' 100 times faster

03/21/2017

Cybersecurity is critical — for national security, corporations and private individuals. Sophisticated cybersecurity systems excel at finding "bad apples" in computer networks, but they lack the computing power to identify the threats directly.

New brain-inspired cybersecurity system detects 'bad apples' 100 times faster

03/21/2017

... The processor in the Neuromorphic Cyber Microscope is based on the neuroscience research of Dr. Pamela Follett, a co-founder of Lewis Rhodes Labs. Follett is a pediatric neurologist and neuroscientist who studies developmental diseases, such as cerebral palsy in children.

New brain-inspired cybersecurity system detects 'bad apples' 100 times faster

03/21/2017

... The Neuromorphic Cyber Microscope, designed by Lewis Rhodes Labs in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories, directly addresses this limitation. Due to its brain-inspired design, it can look for the complex patterns that indicate specific "bad apples," all while using less electricity than a standard 60-watt light bulb.

Building a better (computer) brain for spotting cyberthreats

02/29/2016

... That realization has led Lewis Rhodes Labs to create the Cyber Microscope, a cyber-optimized neuromorphic processor the company claims can increase the speed and resolution of anomaly detection more than 100-fold compared to the average processor.

LRL Cyber Microscope Shapes the Future of Cyber Defense

02/29/2016

Cyber microscope may sound like something from the future but it is indeed reality. It is a tool developed and introduced by Lewis Rhodes Labs. Essentially, LRL Cyber Microscope provides advanced security anomaly detection, and is a quite interesting piece of work.

Cyber microscope enables advanced security anomaly detection

02/26/2016

... The new product is based upon a Cyber Optimized Neuromorphic Processor that increases the speed and resolution of detection by more than 100 times.

New LRL Cyber Microscope Uses Neuromorphic Processors for Advanced Anomaly Detection

02/23/2016

... The extreme speed and precision of the LRL Cyber Microscope enables it to provide analysts with unprecedented coverage and resolution at a fraction of the cost of alternative solutions.

The 'Cyber Microscope' and How it Mimics Our Brain

02/19/2016

A Boston company is unveiling a new cybersecurity tool that will dramatically enhance the way analysts comb through threat data, using the world's first commercially viable processing unit that mimics the way our brains process and distribute information.